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Diatomaceous Earth

The Truth About Diatomaceous Earth: Myth #1 – There is No Conclusive, Unbiased Evidence that Supports Claims about DE

Many years of research, in addition to consumer input, have led diatomaceous earth manufacturers to develop DE insecticide products. In the U.S., in order to be approved, these products must be reviewed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA requires proof of product efficiency therefore, extensive efficacy testing must be completed using the diatomaceous earth against insects. Many DE products are registered with government agencies in the United States and Canada as insecticides, all of which have gone through stringent testing in order to ensure their effectiveness. As well, many University studies have been published in peer reviewed publications that support the use of diatomaceous earth for external parasites. These studies are often conducted without the manufacturer or DE supplier’s prior knowledge and therefore no conflict of interest influences the findings.

Controlled studies examining the effects of DE have also been conducted. Recently, an independent study was conducted by the University of British Columbia and published in Poultry Science, a leading poultry research publication for peer reviewed poultry articles. The results of this study found that our diatomaceous earth was effective at controlling external parasites. Below is an excerpt from the study:

…the effectiveness of DE to treat a Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) infestation was tested. Relative to controls, both breeds of hens that were dusted with DE had reduced number of mites. The results of this study indicate the DE has the potential to be an effective treatment to help control parasites…

In addition to this study, credible research supporting these findings has been completed by many other independent, qualified researchers and published in peer reviewed publications. As well, many consumers have seen similar results.

Categories
Diatomaceous Earth

Absorption vs Adsorption

Although they may look and sound very similar, the meanings of these words are very different.

Absorption refers to the process by which a material takes in the atoms, molecules and ions of another substance. Through the process of absorption one substance takes up another substance through minute pores or spaces between its molecules.

Adsorption, on the other hand, refers to the process by which molecules of a substance collect on the surface of another substance. The molecules are attracted to the surface but do not enter the solid’s minute spaces, as in absorption. Rather, they just gather on the surface of the material.

These two very different occurrences are similar only in that both processes involve the transfer of a volume of mass or energy. Absorption refers to the transfer of a volume into another volume and adsorption refers to the transfer of a volume on to the surface of another mass.

Categories
Diatomaceous Earth

The Truth About Diatomaceous Earth

The Truth About Diatomaceous Earth – Myth #1 – There is No Conclusive, Unbiased Evidence that Supports Claims about DE

Government Agencies

The truth about diatomaceous earth is that many years of research, in addition to consumer input, have led diatomaceous earth manufacturers to develop DE insecticide products. In the U.S., in order to be approved, these products must be reviewed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA requires proof of product efficiency therefore, extensive efficacy testing must be completed using the diatomaceous earth against insects. Many DE products are registered with government agencies in the United States and Canada as insecticides, all of which have gone through stringent testing in order to ensure their effectiveness.

Studies

Many University studies have been published in peer reviewed publications that support the use of diatomaceous earth for external parasites. These studies are often conducted without the manufacturer or DE supplier’s prior knowledge and therefore no conflict of interest influences the findings.

Controlled studies examining the effects of DE have also been conducted. Recently, an independent study was conducted by the University of British Columbia and published in Poultry Science, a leading poultry research publication for peer reviewed poultry articles. The results of this study found that our diatomaceous earth was effective at controlling external parasites. Below is an excerpt from the study:

…the effectiveness of DE to treat a Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) infestation was tested. Relative to controls, both breeds of hens that were dusted with DE had reduced number of mites. The results of this study indicate the DE has the potential to be an effective treatment to help control parasites…

In addition to this study, credible research supporting these findings has been completed by many other independent, qualified researchers and published in peer reviewed publications. As well, many consumers have seen similar results.

Categories
Diatomaceous Earth

How Long is Diatomaceous Earth Effective?

If stored in a safe, dry place, Red Lake Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth will not spoil or go bad.

When applied for the purpose of pest control

Diatomaceous earth will continue to be effective as long as it is not disturbed – kicked up into the air, blown or washed away.

DE should be re-applied if an area gets wet or experiences wind or high traffic, as the powder is easily washed away, blown away and kicked up in to the air by foot traffic.

Try to keep the DE to protected areas, such as cracks and crevices, where it will not be disturbed.

When you are finished

Simply vacuum the diatomaceous earth up.

Please note: While no problems have ever been observed, please be sure to test the product in a small sample space when using it on white or other light colored carpeting or fabrics.

Categories
Diatomaceous Earth

Diatoms: Interesting Facts

Diatomaceous earth is made up of tiny, single-celled organisms known as diatoms.

Diatoms have been studied for hundreds of years and have proved to be amazing organisms, serving various functions in both life and death.

Discovery

Diatoms were discovered in 1702 by Anton van Leeuwenhoek. It was thought that these organisms were tiny animals however, in the 19th century biologists concluded that diatoms are in fact plants, due to the fact that they perform photosynthesis.

Research on Diatoms

Many years ago, in a June 1979 Edition of National Geographic, Richard B. Hoover published an intriguing article about his research on diatoms. Richard traveled the world, examining diatoms and collecting new species. Throughout his travels he saw and learned many things about these extraordinary organisms. Here is a summary of some of the most interesting facts revealed in Richard’s report.

One of the most interesting discoveries mentioned in this paper occurred while Richard was studying a diatom collection in Belgium. He added water to diatoms that had been dried on paper in 1834. Much to his surprise, they were revived by the water and began to swim around – after nearly 150 years!

There has been found to be more than twenty-five thousand species of diatoms, none of which have the same shell. They exist in large numbers in most bodies of water throughout the world. In fact, just one liter of seawater can contain as many as ten million diatoms! Diatoms are the most abundant type of phytoplankton, with the greatest numbers existing in cold oceans.

Diatoms can thrive wherever there is light, water, carbon dioxide, and necessary nutrients. They can be found all across the world, from cold Rocky Mountain streams to thermal springs in Arkansas to polluted pools and road side ditches. In some cases diatoms can even live out of the water. In moist conditions, they are able to live in topsoil, or attached to moss, tree trunks and even brick walls. Diatoms are very resilient and can endure lengthy droughts.

Diatoms vary greatly in size, with the largest measuring only one millimeter across. Two basic forms of these organisms exist. They are known as Centrales and Pennales. Centrales have markings, rows of pores or spines, that exist in perfect symmetry. Most often Centrales live in oceans and are wheel-shaped. They can typically be found drifting near the surface, basking in sunlight and absorbing nutrients. The other type is known as Pennales. Pennales tend to be elongated and have markings in bilateral rows. For the most part, Pennales live in fresh water streams, swamps, ditches, or on the bottoms of shallow regions of oceans and estuaries.

On the tidal sand flats of Cape Cod exists one of the most fascinating species of diatoms. Known as Hantzschia virgata, this species bury themselves in the sand when the tide is. Just after the tide goes out, the diatoms glide to the surface in order to sunbathe. What is so remarkable about this species is that they know precisely when to bury themselves back in to the sand, retreating just moments before the tide returns, saving themselves from being washed out to sea. In fact, it was discovered that even after keeping these diatoms for weeks in a laboratory, under constant light, their impeccable timing remained constant, as they continued to dig in and out of the sand with such amazing accuracy that their actions could be used to predict the tide.

Diatoms are also impressive shell builders. They transform dissolved silicon into a silica almost identical to the gemstone opal. Diatoms contribute enormous amounts of oxygen to our atmosphere and even offer various functions when dead, as diatomaceous earth.

Huge numbers of diatoms die and sink to the bottom of river, lake and ocean beds. In some areas sea floors can be covered in a layer as deep as 984 feet (300 meters)! Over many years these layers of dead diatoms fossilize and become rich deposits of diatomaceous earth, or diatomite.